Micranthemum Monte Carlo is a creeping carpet plant with little round leaves. The genus Micranthemum is also known as mudflower.

It's been two months and my aquatic carpet isn't compact yet. I do need to trim it soon to let it divert its energy and nutrients to the lower creepers. Right now, I don't really mind because the tank inhabitants like to spend a lot of time in it!

mudflower-snail-mouth

This is Chicharrón, a leopard ramshorn snail.

She was calcium-deficient when I got her, but her new shell growth appears to be healthy and smooth. I feed her algae wafers, peas, and zucchini. She also ate all the Pogostemon helferi.

mudflower-snail-back

mudflower-gravid-shrimp

This is a gravid wild-type Neocaridina shrimp, full of eggs.

I'm not sure how many shrimp I have. Their markings are normally orange and brown, but they change colors a lot. Some of them are black right now. They all used to be blue when some of the tissue culture plant jelly got into the tank.

Below is a juvenile shrimp atop Chicharrón.

mudflower-baby-shrimp

Micranthemum Monte Carlo is supposedly not very needy.

My setup is cheap, which is fine with me because I'm prone to really stupid things like spending eighty dollars a bunch of rocks (rocks > tech). I don't inject any CO2, but I do dose bioavailable intermediates via Excel, along with Flourish liquid fertilizer. I use a 9.5W 800-lumen LED light bulb in an old desk lamp, directed at the left side of the tank.

==A==ll plants in this aquarium include: 1. *Micranthemum sp.* 'Monte Carlo' (65-85°F, pH 5.0-7.0) 2. *Anubias barteri var. nana* 'Petite' (72-82°F, pH 6.0-7.5) 3. *Hydrocotyle tripartita* 'Japan' (72-82°F, pH 6.0-7.7) 4. MAYBE *Pogostemon helferi* 'Downoi' (68-86°F, pH 5.5-6.0)
  1. One Betta splendens from Southeast Asia (75-86°F, ph 6.8-7.4)
  2. Two Otocinclus sp. from South America (72-79°F, pH 6.8-7.5)
  3. Many wild-type Neocaridina davidi (60-85°F, pH 6.5-8.0)
  4. One Planorbidae sp. (70-78°F, pH 7.0-7.5)